“Year of the Republican Woman” – a memo from REP. CATHY MCMORRIS RODGERS (R-WA)

***MEMORANDUM***

TO: INTERESTED PARTIES
FROM: REP. CATHY MCMORRIS RODGERS (R-WA)
DATE: THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2010
RE: RECAP: THE “YEAR OF THE REPUBLICAN WOMAN”

Throughout the past several months, 2010 has been widely touted as the “Year of the Republican Woman.” And now that the election has taken place, we can clearly say that women were one of the main reasons Republicans will have their largest majority in the House in over 60 years. Recent exit poll data indicates that GOP candidates overcame the gender gap and won women voters by 2 points (51-49), according to The New York Times. This was the first time House Republicans carried the women vote since exit poll data was utilized (1982). Moreover, the GOP had a 12-point advantage with women 60+ and even made some significant strides with younger women, though more work is still needed on that front.

KEY STATISTICS: REPUBLICAN WOMEN MAKE HISTORIC GAINS ACROSS THE NATION
• Every incumbent Republican woman running for federal or statewide office won reelection.
• U.S. House: 9 new Republican women won seats, beating the previous record of seven Republican women newcomers in a single election (1994).
• U.S. Senate: Kelly Ayotte (NH) won her race.
• At the state level, three new Republican women were elected governor: Susan Martinez (NM), Mary Fallin (OK), and Nikki Haley (SC). In addition, Jan Brewer won reelection as governor of Arizona, and at least a dozen Republican women were newly-elected to other statewide offices.
• All three new women governors are Republicans, including two who won woman-versus-woman races. They include the first Hispanic woman Governor and the first Indian-American woman Governor.
• Republican women also made impressive gains in state legislatures across the nation. The National Conference of State Legislatures reports that preliminary reports show that Republican women gained more than 100 seats in state legislatures, from 529 in 2010 to 633 in 2011.
Republican women made unprecedented gains across the board. Recruitment was historic. Fundraising was unmatched. And history was made. In fact, 128 Republican women ran for the House and 17 for the Senate in 2010 – an all-time record and twice the number who ran during the last cycle.
• U.S. HOUSE
1. Sandy Adams (FL-24)
 Member of the Florida House of Representatives (2002-Present)
 Former law enforcement official
 Served in the United States Air Force
2. Diane Black (TN-06)
 Member of the Tennessee State Senate
 Leader of the State Senate Republican Caucus
 Former nurse and educator
3. Ann Marie Buerkle (NY-25)
 Assistant Attorney General in New York State (1997-Present)
 Registered Nurse
 Small business owner
4. Renee Ellmers (NC-02)
 Clinical Director of the Trinity Wound Care Center
 Registered Nurse
 Former Vice President of Community Development for the Chamber of Commerce
5. Vicky Hartzler (MO-04)
 Served in the Missouri House of Representatives (1994-2000)
 Teacher, Family and Consumer Sciences
 Chairperson of the Missouri Women’s Council
6. Nan Hayworth (NY-19)
 Doctor (ophthalmologist)
 Small business owner
 Vice President in Medical and Scientific Affairs at a New York City health care communications agency
7. Jaime Herrera (WA-03)
 Member of the Washington State House of Representatives (2007-Present)
 Assistant Minority Floor Leader, Washington State House of Representatives
 Former Legislative Assistant on Capitol Hill
8. Kristi Noem (SD-AL)
 Member of the South Dakota State House of Representatives (2006-Present)
 Assistant Majority Leader, South Dakota State House of Representatives
 Farmer/rancher
9. Martha Roby (AL-02)
 Member of the Montgomery City Council (2003-Present)
 Attorney
 Former Associate at Copeland, Franco, Screws and Gill
HOW WERE WE ABLE TO DO IT?
• According to the New York Times, a majority of women voted Republican (51-49%) for the first time in the history of exit polling (in ’94, the GOP lost women by 6 points).
• Women over 60 years old voted Republican by a margin of 12 points (56-44%).

WHY WERE REPUBLICAN WOMEN SUCH COMPELLING CANDIDATES?

The polling company American Viewpoint conducted a survey comparing a generic Republican woman against a generic Democratic man or woman among ticket-splitting voters. The Republican woman consistently beat the Democratic man or woman by overwhelming margins when it comes to issues such as:

• Fiscal responsibility (+30 Republican woman advantage);
• Understanding the problems and concerns of people like you (+23);
• Honesty/Trustworthy (+21);
• Not being controlled by special interests (+16);
• Working across party lines to get things done (+10).

Republican women were viewed as being “better communicators,” “emotionally connected,” “family oriented,” and “independent.”

WHY WERE WOMEN MORE RECEPTIVE TO THE REPUBLICAN MESSAGE THIS YEAR?
The answer is unequivocal: President Obama’s policies.
• ECONOMIC POLICY – Since January 2009, almost 3 million private sector jobs have been lost. And even now – more than two years into the recession – our small business community still doesn’t have the confidence to expand and create jobs. Since women make up a majority of the workforce and 2 out of 3 new small businesses are started by women, these policies disproportionately affect women.
• HEALTH CARE – Women spend 2 out of every 3 health care dollars and they represent the overwhelming majority of professional health providers: 98% of home care aides, 90% of nurses, and majority of first-year medical students, and a third of doctors. Women want to protect their ability to make health care decisions rather than the federal government dictating to them.
Moreover, in a “change” election, Republican women represented “change” better than anyone else. The voters have spoken – loudly and clearly – and they – more than anyone else – have made 2010 the “Year of the Republican Woman.”

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